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Preventing Type II Diabetes with Healthy Holiday and Everyday Eating Habits

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According to the Center for Disease Control, 29.1 million people are living with Type II Diabetes and 8.1 million of those are undiagnosed. There are many factors that put a person at risk, some you can control and others you cannot. These factors include:

• Physical inactivity
• Tobacco use
• Poor diet
• Overweight
• High blood pressure
• High cholesterol
• Impaired fasting glucose (commonly known as pre-diabestes)
• Age
• Race
• Gender
• Family history
• History of gestational diabetes

You can also see if you are at risk for diabetes by taking the diabetes mellitus risk test here: http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/diabetes-risk-test. How can you reduce your risk? Start by aiming for at least 30 minutes per day of activity, quitting smoking, and focusing on eating a healthy diet that is low in sugar. Continue Reading »

Brown Rice Stuffing for Thanksgiving

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Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays, albeit an adopted holiday for me since Thanksgiving is not celebrated in Latin America, where I grew up. This holiday brings together family, friends and of course good food. My family grills turkey on a charcoal grill, serves mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, a broccoli cheese dish, green beans, salad, cranberry sauce, homemade rolls and an assortment of pies (cherry, pumpkin, sweet potato, apple and sometimes pecan pie too). One of the dishes that has recently been added to our menu is stuffing; in part due to the addition of my niece’s husband to the family, who claims this is his favorite part of the meal. So in honor of our expanding family and palates, here is a recipe for a brown rice stuffing.

Ingredients
1/2 cup slivered almonds
2-3 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 medium tart red apple, cored and diced
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/4 teaspoon thyme
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
3 cups cooked brown rice (cooked in chicken or vegetable broth)

Preparation
Cook almonds in butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat until golden brown. Add apple, onion, celery, poultry seasoning, thyme and pepper; continue to cook until vegetables are tender crisp. Stir in cooked rice; cook until thoroughly heated.

Use as stuffing for poultry or pork roast, or bake tightly covered in a separate baking dish at 350 degrees 25 to 30 minutes. Continue Reading »

#GivingTuesday—A Celebration of Generosity

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First there was Thanksgiving. Then Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Now there is  #GivingTuesday, an international movement to celebrate generosity by providing an easy way to give to non-profit organizations in the true spirit of the Christmas season. Both of Affinity Health System’s foundations – Mercy Health Foundation (mmcgift.org) and St. Elizabeth Hospital Foundation (affinityhealth.org/stefoundation) – are participating in #GivingTuesday on December 2, 2014.  We are asking our communities to join us in support of two very special projects that will have an immediate local impact.

#GivingTuesday gifts to Mercy Health Foundation will help Oshkosh-area women undergoing cancer treatment by supporting an updated wig boutique at Mercy Medical Center.

“Everybody’s cancer story is different,” Nancy Wilms, a cancer survivor said. “You have to grieve it and experience it your own way. Still, if some of the steps along the way can be improved, it will be a better journey.”

Nancy volunteers in Mercy’s current wig room to improve what she can for others going through cancer now. For the future, Mercy Health Foundation is raising funds to remodel the existing space to provide patients with a welcoming and private area to refresh and receive the assistance they need to feel good about themselves. Continue Reading »

Myths and Facts about Diabetes

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There are many misconceptions about diabetes, including its causes and how to manage it. In recognition of National Diabetes Awareness Month, this article will address some popularly held beliefs about diabetes that may not mesh with reality.

Myth: Eating sugar (or too much sugar) causes diabetes.
Fact: There are many causes of diabetes, but eating sugar is not one of them. Type 1 diabetes, in which the pancreas does not produce the insulin needed to transport glucose to the body’s cells, is caused by genetics and other factors we haven’t discovered yet (some research suggests viruses are the culprit). Type 2 diabetes may be caused by genetics as well, or a host of lifestyle factors. Sugar intake alone is not enough to cause diabetes.

Myth: Going “sugar free” will prevent me from developing diabetes.
Fact: While there is no question that most Americans eat too much sugar, there is no research that supports going “sugar free” results in being diabetes free. Given that the American diet is high in added sugars, most health care providers agree that keeping an eye on the amount of added sugars we consume leads to better general wellness.

Myth: People with diabetes cannot eat pasta, rice or desserts and have to eat special food.
Fact: While individuals with diabetes may be more conscious of foods that raise their blood sugar levels, they can enjoy any kind of food they’d like in moderation. Healthy eating plans for people with diabetes are typically the same as most health professionals would recommend for anyone else:

  • Low in saturated fats
  • Heart-healthy fats and fiber
  • Moderate in salt and sugar
  • Lean sources of protein
  • Fruit and non-starchy vegetables
  • Whole grains such as brown rice and oats

People with diabetes—like everyone else—should enjoy dessert such as chocolate and other sweets in moderation. The key to good blood sugar control is to follow a sensible eating plan: keep an eye on portions, lead an active lifestyle and be compliant with medications.

Myth: Getting diabetes means never leading a healthy life.
Fact: There is a difference between living with diabetes and living with well-controlled diabetes. When individuals with diabetes manage their condition properly, for example avoiding spikes and drops in blood sugar levels, they can prevent or delay other complications of the disease. Having a positive relationship with food and knowing how much of what to eat, being physically active, seeking the support of others, keeping up with doctor visits, managing stress and controlling blood sugar levels are key to leading a healthy life with diabetes. These recommendations are what everyone else could benefit from as well!

What other myths have you hear about diabetes? Send us your comments!

For more information about diabetes, visit the American Diabetes Association at www.diabetes.org

How Daylight Saving Time can affect your sleep patterns

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Losing or gaining an hour of sleep on any given day doesn’t necessarily throw our sleep patterns into a tailspin, but the Daylight Saving Time change poses a bigger issue than a long nap’s worth of sleep. In addition to the minutes of sleep you’re gaining or losing, you’re also adjusting to light cycles. With “falling back,” you’re shifting your internal clock later while the sky is getting darker—and bringing cues for bedtime—earlier. Here are a few areas to look out for when it comes to how your body reacts to this transition:

On the road
Just because the clocks have changed doesn’t mean your schedule has. Studies have shown that there is an uptick in car accidents in the weeks following the fall Daylight Saving Time change, in part because even if people aren’t physically more tired, a sudden adjustment in sleep patterns can lead to lower cognitive performance. This includes performance behind the wheel. If you’re driving as it’s getting dark out when you’re used to driving in daylight, it could take some time to adjust, so be extra mindful when you’re on the road.

Mind your mood
For many people, it’s hard to get out of bed to a dark sky. As our daylight hours get shorter, it’s important to seek out mood-enhancing sunlight when we can. In the first weeks after the time change you may actually be able to sync your wake time with the rising daylight; if you’re susceptible to the “winter blues,” take advantage of this early morning boost! Further into the winter season, try to schedule sunlight breaks during the day. Getting up in the dark and then heading home in the same conditions can be a real hit to your mood, making exposure to natural light a much needed bonus. Continue Reading »

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The Affinity Health System blog contains opinions and views created by community members. Affinity does endorse the contributions of community members. You should not assume the information posted by community members is accurate and you should never disregard or delay seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this site.