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Facts about depression

Did you know that depression affects more than 350 million people worldwide?
Did you know that women suffer from depression twice as often as men?
Did you know that many people suffer with depression but do not seek help?
Did you know that depression is treatable?

Everyone has a bad day or a case of the blues once in a while, but when “the blues” result in experiencing little or no joy in your daily life, it may be an indication of something more serious. Chronic sadness or a depressed mood is something that lingers for quite some time and is difficult to shake off if untreated.

Depression is nothing to be ashamed of, nor is it a sign of weakness. Anyone can be affected by depression and its onset could be due to many things, such as hormonal changes, brain chemical imbalances, medications or life crisis situations.

So how do you know if what you or someone you know is experiencing is much more than just a case of “the blues?” The short mood survey included below may help you understand that feelings of sadness or isolation could be an indication of something more serious. More than 2,000 individuals have taken this survey in our area and it has proven to be a very beneficial tool for many.

To take the Test Your Mood survey, click on the link below:
http://www.mentalhealthscreening.org/screening/NEW Continue Reading »

The ABCs of healthy aging


Back in your school days you learned to use the alphabet as the building blocks for words, but do you know the building blocks of healthy aging? Your education isn’t complete until you’ve reviewed the ABCs of aging well—in both mind and body!

  • A: Fight anemia
    While not caused by aging per se, anemia is a common condition in older adults and is often the result of more than one issue, such as poor diet, medications or hormone imbalances. If you’re experiencing symptoms of anemia—fatigue, feeling cold, paleness, weakness—talk to your clinician.
  • B: Break routine
    Make small changes in your daily routine to increase brain stimulation. Something as simple as taking a different route on a daily walk or trying something new for breakfast can be enough spark to keep your mind fresh instead of foggy.
  • C: Cultivate your relationships
    Staying connected with people is an important aspect of mental health. Maintain communication with your family and friends, especially after a significant loss or life change.
  • D: Dine with others
    Plan meals with friends and family several times a week. Studies show that those who share meals with others eat less than those who eat alone, decreasing your risk of overeating, and keeping your weight in check.
  • E: Eat healthy foods
    Did you know that a high percentage of adults in the U.S. consume more than double the recommended intake of sodium? Too much sodium can lead to hypertension and cardiovascular disease, so skip the extra salt and focus on nutrient-dense food like fruits, vegetables and whole-grains.
  • F: Fight fatigue
    If you’re feeling tired during the day more often, having a glass of water and a high-antioxidant food, like prunes or blueberries, can revitalize the body and stimulate the mind. Continue Reading »

Strep throat now treatable via HealtheVisits


We are excited to announce that you can now use HealtheVisits to treat strep throat! All you have to do is head over to healthevisits.org and submit an online interview request. An Affinity Medical Group or Ministry Medical Group clinician will review the request within one hour. To confirm a positive strep throat diagnosis, a clinician will order a lab test, called a ZipTicket, which will be sent to you electronically via email.

A ZipTicket allows you to bypass waiting and go directly to one of our labs for a rapid strep test to confirm the diagnosis. When you receive your ZipTicket, you can either print a hard copy of it or bring it up electronically on your phone at one of three available lab locations. When the results of the strep test are available you will receive a final diagnosis that, if necessary, will include a prescription to treat your strep throat.

ZipTickets are accepted at select urgent care locations in the Fox Valley, and we are working to increase the number of labs that will accept them. Below are the urgent care locations where you can currently use your ZipTicket:

Continue Reading »

Foods that help you stay hydrated


Some people find it difficult to reach for water during the day. By incorporating these foods into your diet, you’ll secretly be satisfying your thirst and hunger at the same time!

Here’s a list of quintessential fruits and vegetables to keep your body hydrated throughout the day.

  • Cucumber
    • Sailing in with 96.7 percent water content, cucumbers are at the top of everyone’s food list to stay hydrated. Because it has the highest water content of any solid food, its crunchiness is perfect in salads, sandwiches or served with dip. To make cucumber infused water, simply add cucumber slices to a pitcher of water for a refreshing treat.
  • Radishes
    • This refreshing root veggie has a spicy, yet sweet flavor. Radishes have a water content of 95.3 percent, and are filled with antioxidants that help you get the nutrients your body needs. Toss it into your regular coleslaw recipe or add it to your dinner salad to stay hydrated. You can also use thin slices of radishes as a garnish or in soups!
  • Watermelon
    • The king of summer fruit has water right in its name, and 91.5 percent of this delicious fruit is water. Along with a sweet, delectable taste, it contains high amounts of lycopene, a cancer-fighting antioxidant. Not only is watermelon terrific on its own, try adding it to a salad topped with feta cheese this fall. Be adventurous and try grilling it too!
  • Spinach
    • Although iceberg lettuce has higher water content, spinach contains more nutrients for your body. With 91.4 percent water content, spinach is rich in lutein, potassium, fiber and folate. Try substituting iceberg lettuce for spinach. As a rule of thumb– the greener the lettuce, the better it is for you.
  • Strawberries
    • Strawberries go great with just about anything and come in with 91 percent water content. Juicy, red strawberries contain more water than other berries. Toss together with spinach, walnuts and poppy seed dressing for a nutrient-packed dish.

    Continue Reading »

8 tips for childhood stuttering


Stuttering is a communication disorder of which the flow of speech is broken by repetitions (li-li-like this), prolongations (lllllike this), or abnormal stoppages (no sound) of sounds and syllables. There may also be unusual facial and body movements associated with the effort to speak.

About five percent of all children will go through a stage of developmental stuttering. This period of stuttering consists of easy repetitions without tension or signs of struggling. Most dysfluencies are only two or three repetitions in length and most of the time the child will appear unaware of the stuttering and will continue talking without signs of distress.

75 percent of these children will begin to spontaneously recover from normal dysfluencies after approximately six months. At the six-month mark you will want to note if your child’s speech is improving, staying the same or getting more difficult for them.

If you are worried about your child’s dysfluency consider these factors when deciding if it is time to talk with your child’s doctor or a speech language pathologist:

  1. Is your child a boy? 4x more boys stutter than girls.
  2. Is there a family history of stuttering? If yes, it is more likely your child may need skilled intervention.
  3. Has the dysfluent speech lasted longer than six months? If your child’s speech has not improved or has become more dysfluent, your child may need skilled intervention.
  4. Is your child aware of the stuttering? A child who stops talking, avoids words, abandons a message or verbalizes talking being difficult is more likely to need skilled intervention.
  5. Do you see increased facial or body movements when your child is stuttering? If you are noticing increased eye blinking, head nodding, facial tension, hand or foot tapping it is more likely your child may need skilled intervention.

Answering “yes” to two or more of these questions indicates it is time to talk to your child’s pediatrician about next steps. Continue Reading »

Disclaimer: The information found on Affinity's blog is a general educational aid. Do not rely on this information or treat it as a substitute for personal medical or health care advice, or for diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your physician or other qualified health care provider as soon as possible about any medical or health-related question and do not wait for a response from our experts before such consultation. If you have a medical emergency, seek medical attention immediately.

The Affinity Health System blog contains opinions and views created by community members. Affinity does endorse the contributions of community members. You should not assume the information posted by community members is accurate and you should never disregard or delay seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this site.