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Staying Healthy During Flu Season

sneezingThe flu season is under way in Wisconsin and confirmed cases have been reported. While the best way to stay healthy this flu season is to get vaccinated, there are some other things you can do to protect yourself.

Here are a few:

1.  Practice good hand hygiene. Encourage everyone in your family to practice regular handwashing, especially after using the bathroom, before and after handling or eating food and after coming in from the outdoors. Handwashing is one of the best ways to remove germs, avoid getting sick and prevent the spread of germs to others.

2.  Take cover. Get into the habit of sneezing into your inner elbow. If you have a tissue, cover your nose and mouth with it when you sneeze or cough.

3.  Don’t touch. Avoid touching your face, eyes, nose or mouth with your hands.

4.  Replace and wash items. Buy a new toothbrush after a cold or other illness. Wash your bedding at least once a week, especially pillow covers. Wash gloves, scarves and any other attire that covers your face or mouth. This is helpful in keeping germs away.

5.  Stay hydrated. Dry nasal passages make it easier for the flu virus to breed, so its important to drink plenty of fluids. Water is a natural moisturizer for the inside of your body. Aim for eight cups of water a day. Swap out fizzy carbonated drinks for herbal tea. Increase your fluid intake if you are on a high-fiber or high-protein diet. Continue Reading »

Handwashing tips to help prevent the spread of colds and the flu

handwashing Frequent and proper handwashing is the key to killing germs and preventing the spread of colds and the flu. You might already know that, but do you really know the right way to wash your hands?  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, here’s how:

1. Wash your hands with warm running water and soap.

2. Rub your hands together for at least 20 seconds (as long as it takes to sing once through the ABCs or Happy Birthday).

3. Be sure to wash your wrists, the backs of your hands, between your fingers and under your fingernails.

4. Leave the water running while you dry your hands on a paper towel.

5. Protect your hands with the paper towel while you turn off the water. This will prevent your clean hands from touching the faucet – a potential source of germs.

When soap and water aren’t available, gel sanitizers or wipes containing 60-90 percent ethyl alcohol or isopropanol are the next best thing. Keep these in your car, purse or desk. Using a dime-size amount of gel, rub your hands together, covering all surfaces of the skin and nails, until the gel is dry.

Continue Reading »

Resolution tips to keep you on track

shutterstock_169613255We’re about a week into 2014, so I thought it would be a good idea to see how everyone’s resolutions have been going. Good, I hope!? I’ve noticed that a lot of resolutions people make revolve around wellness. Losing weight tops the list of the ten most popular resolutions along with staying fit, quitting smoking, spending less, getting more organized and spending more time with the family.

About 45 percent of Americans make New Year’s resolutions, but less than 10 percent actually succeed in achieving their resolution or goal. Unfortunately, resolutions tend to be abandoned quickly. Why is that?

  1. Too vague. More specific goals tend to result in more successful outcomes. General goals are hard to grasp and usually result in loss of interest. Analyze what you are really trying to accomplish and break it down into more specific goals. Instead of “I will drink more water,” try, “I will keep a water bottle on my office desk, in my car, on my nigh stand and drink at least eight cups of water a throughout the day.”
  2. It can be lonely sometimes. While personal goals are… personal, but the effort to reach that goal does not have to be. Studies show that the more you share what you are trying to accomplish with others, a support network, family, friends, etc. the more successful you will be. Friends and family can support your efforts to achieve your resolution. Workout with a buddy, go running with your neighbor find a “team” that will motivate you.
  3. You lose track. As tedious as it sounds, keeping track of your efforts does help.  Whether they are food journals, or fitness trackers; pedometers that track how  many steps you’ve taken in a day or an app that lets you know how many hours of sleep you’ve gotten, can help hone in on areas you want to work on. In addition, it keeps you accountable and well… on track!
  4. Forgetfulness. People who are reminded of their goal on a consistent basis tend to be more successful in achieving those goals. The best thing to avoid losing focus of your goal is to write it down. Make yourself several notes with your goal written on it and post these all over your house; on the bathroom mirror, on the refrigerator and pantry door; in your car, etc. Make yourself a bookmark and keep it in your favorite book; write it as a screen saver for your computer, tablet or phone. Tell your friends and family. If your goal is to drink more water for example, you can easily program your phone, computer or table to make a sound every hour as a reminder to drink water. If your goal is to get more physically active, carve out time in your calendar (write it in) to do just that. 
  5. No reward system. Good deeds should be rewarded. If you reach a milestone along the way to your final goal, do something good for yourself (do not reward yourself with food). Buy a book, enjoy a massage, take a day off work, etc. Do something that will create a positive feeling. It’ll keep you  motivated. 

Above all, when making resolutions try to focus on ONE behavior change. Trying to change too many things at once is NOT a strategy that will lead to success. Good luck to you and a happy 2014 to all!

Cast art for kids

castart_1“Hey, cool cast!” is something we often hear at the Orthopedic and Sports Medicine clinic at Affinity. Unfortunately, accidents happen and when they do we call on orthopedic surgeons to help mend broken bones. The healing process usually involves the wearing of a cast, splint or sometimes even surgery.

When I was training at the University of Colorado, I learned about a program developed by the orthopedists there called cast art. Kids that had to wear casts for long periods of time (typically involving the combination of surgery and casting) were able to decorate their cast. The kids could pick colored casting materials, glow-in-the-dark materials and specialty prints such as camouflage or NFL logos. Some patients heavily decorated their casts with markers or paints. Continue Reading »

Panko-Crusted Salmon

salmon

My eight-year-old daughter loves fish. One of her favorites is salmon and this is one of our favorite ways to prepare it. The recipe comes from Ina Garten popularly known as the Barefoot Contessa on the Food Network show. This is a very easy recipe to make.

When preparing fish at home make sure to practice food safety rules: wash hands before handling fish, use a designated cutting board (wash and disinfect after use) and avoid raw meat drippings to cross contaminate other surfaces.

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup panko* (Japanese dried bread flakes)
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 4 (6- to 8-ounce) salmon fillets, skin on
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • Lemon wedges, for serving Continue Reading »

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