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Brown Rice Stuffing for Thanksgiving

brownrice

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays, albeit an adopted holiday for me since Thanksgiving is not celebrated in Latin America, where I grew up. This holiday brings together family, friends and of course good food. My family grills turkey on a charcoal grill, serves mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, a broccoli cheese dish, green beans, salad, cranberry sauce, homemade rolls and an assortment of pies (cherry, pumpkin, sweet potato, apple and sometimes pecan pie too). One of the dishes that has recently been added to our menu is stuffing; in part due to the addition of my niece’s husband to the family, who claims this is his favorite part of the meal. So in honor of our expanding family and palates, here is a recipe for a brown rice stuffing.

Ingredients
1/2 cup slivered almonds
2-3 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 medium tart red apple, cored and diced
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/4 teaspoon thyme
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
3 cups cooked brown rice (cooked in chicken or vegetable broth)

Preparation
Cook almonds in butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat until golden brown. Add apple, onion, celery, poultry seasoning, thyme and pepper; continue to cook until vegetables are tender crisp. Stir in cooked rice; cook until thoroughly heated.

Use as stuffing for poultry or pork roast, or bake tightly covered in a separate baking dish at 350 degrees 25 to 30 minutes. Continue Reading »

Apples: so much variety, so many benefits!

apples

Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, Gala, Fuji, Granny Smith—these are just a small portion of the 7,500 varieties of apples grown around the world. Apples come in all shades of red, green and yellow. With so many different types out there, it may be challenging to decide which apples to buy, especially now that we are in the midst of apple season and plenty of fresh apples are available.

All types of apples are good sources of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants with only slight variations in nutritional value. Below is a brief description of some of the most popular apples.

Red Delicious is probably the most recognized apple in this area. When you say ‘apple’ the Red Delicious is often what comes to mind. Red Delicious apples have the highest source of antioxidants and are great defenders against cellular damage.

Fuji apples are sweeter, crisper and have a longer shelf life compared to other varieties. In fact, when refrigerated properly, these apples can last up to a year without spoiling! In addition to their lengthy shelf life, these apples are high in potassium. Potassium is a mineral that acts as an electrolyte in the body and helps to regulate heart rhythm, blood pressure and muscle movements. Golden Delicious and Gala apples are also good sources of potassium.

Granny Smith apples are known for their crispness and tart flavor. While vitamin C is a nutrient found in most fruits and vegetables, Granny Smiths have particularly high levels. Vitamin C acts as an antioxidant, aids in wound healing and with repairing and maintaining bones and teeth.

Next time you are at the grocery store or farmer’s market, keep an eye out for the varieties of apples that are grown right here in Wisconsin! It is always a good idea to buy local products as they do not have to travel as far and are fresher in taste. Of the types listed above, Gala apples are most likely to be grown locally. Continue Reading »

Back-to-school nutrition supplies

nutritionsupplies

Going back to school is a life event that brings a mixture of emotions for parents: relief that the erratic summer schedule is done, sadness at seeing their little ones start school for the first time or enter a new grade level, or pride in seeing their student reach milestones like high school or their first year of college.

My Facebook feed gets filled with school registration photos at this time of year, along with posts from parents stating how proud they are for beating the store rush and buying all of their school supplies a month ago. I was one of them, too. I also stocked up on healthy food items in preparation for packing my daughter’s lunch.

As you’re planning your student’s lunches, consider what would make for nutritious choices that she or he could consume in about 20 minutes that would also keep them full for a while. Below are my go-to choices for my daughter’s lunches this school year: Continue Reading »

Kohlrabi? What is that?

kohlrabi

As I excitedly looked at my vegetable share to see what veggies were in my community garden box, I noticed lettuce leaves, radishes, beets, and among other wonderful vegetables, two kohlrabi. Hmm, I know what this is, I thought to myself, but I have to admit that I have not cooked with it that often. I sought out information about this tuberous vegetable and found some interesting facts.

Kohlrabi is also known as the German turnip or the turnip cabbage and it is a commonly eaten vegetable in Germany and other German speaking countries. It is also enjoyed in other countries, such as India.

If you have ever wondered what kohlrabi tastes likes, it is similar to the taste of a broccoli stem, but sweeter and milder. It is crunchy, crisp and a bit juicy. Kohlrabi can be pale green, white or purple. It is grown in Wisconsin and its peak harvest occurs in late June, July and again in September and October.

There are many ways to enjoy kohlrabi. It could be eaten raw and added to salads or slaws. It can be grated and mixed with eggs and other vegetables to make a frittata. Kohlrabi leaves can also be eaten much like collard greens. Both tuber and leaves can be added to either broth-based or cream-based soups. It can be steamed and mashed with mashed potatoes. Kohlrabi can also be roasted; the outside might caramelize a little bit and its flavor will sweeten and mellow. Continue Reading »

Delicious and nutritious: corn – summer’s candy

corn

Zea mays. Maize. Maiz.

All of these terms refer to what we typically call corn. There is perhaps no other food that says ‘summer’ like fresh corn on the cob.

Aside from being delicious, corn has a very important role in the history of the Americas, especially in Mesoamerica, the region that is now known as Mexico and Central America. It was also an integral part of Native American history and cuisine. Although corn is not so much revered as a sacred food today, it is still common in our modern diet. American farmers grow about 40 percent of all corn that is consumed. Much of this comes from the ‘corn belt,’ the region made up of Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, Minnesota and parts of Kansas, Missouri and the Dakotas.

Corn comes in varieties of yellow, white, red, pink, black, purple and blue. No matter what color it is, corn contains antioxidants such as carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin. Antioxidants are substances found in plant foods that help repair the cellular damage that occurs due to environmental pollutants and normal wear and tear of our bodies. They are in effect the “anti-rusting” agents for our cells.

Corn is also an excellent source of fiber, providing an estimated four to five grams of fiber per cup. In addition, it contains vitamins such as B1, B5 and folic acid and has about five to six grams of protein per cup.

Aside from being nutritious, corn is also versatile! It can be steamed and eaten right off the cob or grilled, roasted or included in soups and stews. It can top salads, be ground up and made into tortillas or creamed corn. It can be popped and enjoyed as a snack in the ever popular popcorn that we enjoy so much.

I enjoy eating corn on the cob with a little bit of butter, salt and pepper. How do you enjoy eating/preparing corn?

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