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Wisconsin: 15th most obese state in the country

wisc-01Wisconsin may be known as “America’s Dairyland” but these days it is also getting a reputation for being one of the most obese states in the nation, ranking 15th in the country. In Wisconsin, one in three adults are obese. Obesity is defined by having a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30.

According to a new report by Trust for America’s Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation titled “F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future, 2013”, every state in the country has an adult obesity rate above 20 percent. This is a startling increase given that in 1980 no states had an adult obesity rate above 15 percent. Continue Reading »

Patient blog: How I reclaimed my life from diabetes

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“Like many people in my family, I am diabetic. I was diagnosed with type II diabetes several years ago, but thanks to my primary care physician, Dr. Brian Scott, the disease had not progressed considerably until this past winter. Despite my efforts to control it through exercise and diet, my blood sugar levels rose considerably, peaking at 8.9 A1C in March. Dr. Scott’s nurses, Shawn and Heather contacted me at regular intervals to monitor the situation. When Dr. Scott referred me to Lee Cleveland at Affinity Medical Group on Midway Road, I was not sure he was going to be able to help much. Faced with the probability of starting a new and very expensive medication, I listened carefully to Lee’s advice on controlling my carbohydrate intake. After two months of better dieting and riding my bicycle every possible day, my A1C levels fell to 6.5 and Dr. Scott was able to put the new medication on hold. Now that I limit the carbohydrate intake and keep riding my bike as often as possible, I feel better and feel that I can continue to improve. I truly appreciate the excellent care given by the medical professionals mentioned above.”

-Gary, a grateful patient

Workplace Wellness Tip: Got Stress? Take a Walk!

Stress is one of the biggest threats to your employees’ health. Help decrease their stress by encouraging walking throughout the day! Walking breaks, even for 10 minutes once or twice a day, will help employees increase physical activity and clear their mind from the day’s stress. These short breaks will allow employees to return to their work station rejuvenated and ready to tackle the rest of the day’s tasks.Take it one step further by encouraging meetings on the go! Who says all meetings need to take place in a conference room? Boost your wellness culture by encouraging walk-and-talk meetings.

Stay Active in Cold Weather

Stay Active in Cold Weather

Exercise in winter? It can be done! All you need is a little childlike spirit. Become a kid again with these fun cardio activities that burn calories and work your muscles–all while having tons of family fun.

Ice skating: Strap on the skates for some healthy figure-8s. Ice skating burns approximately 500 calories per hour.

Snow shoeing: Take the family on a winter nature walk! Trekking through the snow burns 400 or more calories an hour.

Cross-country skiing: This excellent sport works muscles you didn’t even know you had, burning more than 400 calories in an hour.

Downhill skiing: Feel the exhilaration of brisk air in your lungs while you zoom downhill to the tune of 300 calories per hour.

Build a snowman or snow fort: Aw, come on, who doesn’t love a snowman? This fun family activity can be good for your mental and physical health. Rolling and trudging through snow in the yard burns 285 calories an hour.

Sledding: Climbing uphill is great exercise — burning nearly 400 calories an hour — all for the bonus reward of whizzing back down with happy kids shrieking in your ear.

All calculations are based on a 150-pound person.

Recipe For A Successful New Year’s Resolution

Store displays and music on the radio station seem to indicate that the holiday season is upon us. Thanksgiving feasts are being planned, December parties organized and in some cases end of the year resolutions considered. New Year’s resolutions are as common as apple pie. More than half of Americans consider exercising more while more than one third cite weight loss as their New Year resolution. Others double up the promise by committing to do both in the upcoming year. But despite all the good intentions, most resolutions are soon forgotten come spring.

Studies have shown time and time again that for a resolution to succeed certain parameters have to be in place. Probably the most important is how well our resolutions, goals or promises are articulated. Ideally goals should be S.M.A.R.T.

S = Specific

Vague goals will likely fail. Instead of “I want to lose weight,” consider making “I want to lose 15 pounds by June” or “I want to lose one pound a week” the goal. The more specific the goal, the better the results.

M = Measurable

Can you measure your success? Ask yourself “Is there anyway I can measure how I am doing?” or “How will I know that I have reached my goal?”  For example: “I want to drink more water” does not really tell you how much more you want to drink. A better goal might be “I want to drink 8 cups of water each day,” or consider “I want to drink two more cups of water than what I am currently drinking every day.” These goals tell you exactly how much, and it will be easier for you to measure how well you are doing with this goal.

A = Achievable

Ask yourself: “What is important for me to achieve?” or “Is my goal too easy or too hard?” This is where you have to really know yourself and be honest with yourself. If you make the goal too easy you won’t really feel that you have accomplished much. If you make it too hard you might feel disappointed if you don’t reach it.

R = Realistic

Ask yourself: “Am I willing and able to work toward this goal?” and “How hard am I willing and able to work toward this goal?” If you truly believe that you can achieve your goal, you most likely will. You can make hard goals that are realistic but know how challenging your goal should be.

T = Time

Ask yourself: “Have I given myself enough time to reach my goal?” S.M.A.R.T. goals usually include some sort of deadline or timeline. “I will lose weight this year” does not really tell you much about when you will lose the weight. Will you lose all you want the first month or the last month of the year? Again, you have to be honest and be able to articulate how long you are willing to give yourself to reach your goal. Deadlines also give you something to look forward to during your efforts.

When resolving to change a habit, do it slowly. Focus on one habit at a time. Working on too many habits at once will likely be frustrating. Also, don’t forget that you don’t have to set just one big goal for the behavior you want to change. You can start by focusing on short term baby steps that lead to your overall goal. So you may want to focus on ways to cut down on evening snacking for example, which ties in to your overall resolution to lose weight. However, remember to make these short term goals S.M.A.R.T. goals as well for better results.

 

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