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What you need to know about Enterovirus D68, also known as EV-D68

shutterstock_76659340There’s a good chance you’ve heard about Enterovirus D68, or EV-D68, a rare virus similar to the common cold that is infecting U.S. children across the Midwest. Here’s what you need to know about this virus:

What is it?
EV-D68 is an infection that can cause mild to severe respiratory illness. The virus can be found in saliva, nasal mucus and sputum. It is spread from person to person when an infected person coughs, sneezes or touches contaminated surfaces. Washing hands can help reduce the risk of catching or spreading the virus.

Who is at risk?
Infants, children and teenagers are most likely to get infected because they do not have immunity from previous exposures to this virus. Children with asthma have a higher risk for respiratory illness and should take all of their regularly prescribed medication and have rescue medications on hand. Infections are more common in the summer and fall months.

What are the symptoms?
Symptoms of EV-D68 infection aren’t much different than common respiratory viruses like influenza or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

Symptoms include:
• Cough
• Runny nose
• Shortness of breath
• Sneezing
• Body and muscle aches
• Fever

Severe symptoms may include wheezing or difficulty breathing. If at any time your child is having difficulty breathing, has blue lips or is gasping for air, please seek immediate medical attention.

What are the treatments?
There is no specific treatment for people infected with EV-D68. Over-the-counter medications will help relieve some of the mild respiratory symptoms mentioned above. Aspirin should not be given to children.

What can be done to prevent contraction of EV-D68?
You can help stop potential outbreaks/infections by following these prevention tips: Continue Reading »

Cold vs. flu: how to read and treat your symptoms

fluCough, congestion, aches, chills. Cold and flu season is upon us. But which do you have? And why does it matter?

Both the common cold and influenza (the flu) are respiratory illnesses, but flu symptoms are more severe than the common cold and can lead to complications such as pneumonia or bacterial infections.

To protect yourself and others, it’s important to schedule a flu shot with your Primary Care Provider.

Flu Vaccine Update: If you have kids, the American Academy of Pediatrics no longer recommends the nasal spray vaccine after studies showed poor effectiveness. Therefore, our clinicians only offer the shot vaccine.

Get the FACTS

While many cold symptoms can mimic the flu, there are five FACTS that generally point to influenza:

  • Fever
  • Aches
  • Chills
  • Tiredness
  • Sudden symptoms

Continue Reading »

Treating a stomach bug

Did you know that the flu shot we get in the fall is NOT for the “stomach flu”? You know, the vomiting and diarrhea bug? We get many calls at NurseDirect from people who have gotten the flu shot and can’t understand why they have vomiting and diarrhea. The flu shot is for upper respiratory problems, headaches, body aches, sore throats and the overall hit-by-a-truck feeling. So the influenza shot you get in the fall will unfortunately not protect you from the stomach bug that seems to ravage the Valley in the fall and winter.

This gastroenteritis, or stomach flu as it is frequently called, seems to hit hardest later in the year but can appear all year long. Often times it starts suddenly with an onslaught of vomiting over and over, followed by diarrhea right behind it. Although it seems endless at the time, the worst of the vomiting usually ends after 8-10 hours. The diarrhea tapers off, but doesn’t completely leave your system for several days. Remember though, everyone’s immune system is different and these viral bugs hit people differently. All models vary! You may or may not have fever with this bug.

There can be a lot of abdominal cramping with the stomach flu. Typically the cramps build up until you vomit or pass some stool. It lets up a little, only to build up and start the cycle again. Now, this is the important part! If the cramps or pain become constant and relentless it may not be the stomach flu. It is important to distinguish this difference between constant pain and intermittent-type pain. Constant pain could indicate something more serious and you need to see your doctor! Continue Reading »

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