Home » Posts tagged "health" (Page 4)

How to ease carpal tunnel syndrome pain

carpal tunnel Did your hands wake you from sleep again? Maybe you had to sit up and shake your hands to make the numbness and pain go away. How many nights has it been since you’ve had a good night’s sleep?  You may have carpal tunnel syndrome.

Carpal tunnel syndrome is caused by swelling around the median nerve in the wrist. This can result in numbness, tingling or pain at the hand and fingers. Usually these symptoms come and go but some activities such as sleeping with your wrists curled, driving or holding a book or phone can make them worse.

We take care of many patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Some have suffered with it for days. Others have been dealing with it for years. Regardless of how long you have had it, here are some tricks to try to help relieve your numb or painful hands: Continue Reading »

Five ways acupuncture can help athletes

acupuncture Acupuncture is a branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine and is one of the world’s oldest medical treatments still in use today. People have been using the ancient therapy to heal trauma, manage pain and maintain health for over 2,500 years.

Acupuncture involves placing fine needles into specific points on the body to elicit a healing response. The stimulation of these needles corrects the flow of energy, or Qi, along channels throughout the body called meridians. It has long been proven to be successful for people of all ages and physical conditions. It’s no surprise that athletes can gain a competitive edge over their opponents by integrating this technique into their training regimen. Continue Reading »

Food borne illness prevention tips

clean upMany food borne illnesses – which can be caused by a variety of microorganisms including bacteria, viruses and parasites – are caused by consuming contaminated foods or beverages. While most of the food in the U.S. can be considered safe, food can become contaminated at any point in its preparation.  There are many simple food safety rules that we can all practice in our home kitchens to keep our food safe. Here are a few:

Hand Hygiene

  • Wash hands when they are dirty. A good rule to follow is to wash your hands when you come home from being outside. (Just think of all the things you have touched when out shopping, running errands, etc.)
  • Wash hands before handling food, and before and after eating.
  • Wash hands after handling pets and other animals.
  • Wash hands after using the bathroom.
  • Try not to touch your eyes, nose or mouth. Practice cough etiquette by coughing (and sneezing) in the crook of your arm.

Wash Surfaces

  • Keep kitchen surfaces such as countertops, cutting boards and other appliances clean.
  • Check your can openers and clean them after each use.
  • Wash dishcloths, sponges and towels often. Use hot water. *Tip: put sponges in your next dishwasher load to clean them.
  • Replace worn sponges frequently.

Cutting Boards

  • Whether you use wood, plastic, acrylic, glass or other type of cutting boards the key is to designate one strictly for raw meats and another for ready to eat foods such as breads, fruits and vegetables. Try using color-coded cutting boards. Designate a certain colored cutting board for vegetables and another colored board for meats to help you remember which one to use.
  • Keep cutting boards clean by washing them thoroughly in hot soapy water after each use; or place them in the dishwasher after each use. The safest way to clean ‘meat’ cutting boards is to wash them with hot water and then disinfect them with bleach or other sanitizing solution. Keeping a spray bottle with bleach by your kitchen sink may be convenient.
  • Discard cutting boards that have a lot of scratches or knife scars, cracks, crevices, splinters, etc.

Prevent Cross Contamination

  • When storing raw meats, place them on a plate and store them on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator so their juices don’t inadvertently drip onto other foods.
  • If washing produce before use, store in clean containers not their original one.
  • Wash plates and other containers between use or use different plates to hold raw meats and other foods.
  • Use one utensil to taste the food and a different one to stir the food.
  • If you have a cut or other sores on your hands use gloves.

Proper Cooking Temperatures

  • Cooking food to proper temperatures is a reliable way to reduce the risk of food borne illnesses.
  • Using a food thermometer is important to ensure that food is cooked to a safe temperature.
  • To ensure that red meats, chops, poultry etc. are cooked to their proper temperature, insert a thermometer into the thickest part of the meat away from bone or gristle.
  • Insert thermometer in the inner thigh area near the breast, but not touching the bone when cooking whole poultry.
  • For egg dishes and casseroles, insert thermometer in the center or thickest area of the dish.
  • For ground meat foods, insert thermometer into the thickest area. You may have to insert it sideways to reach the very center of a burger patty, for example.
  • When cooking fish, cook until it is opaque and flakes easily with a fork.

Refrigerate Promptly

  • Make sure your refrigerator is set below 40º F.
  • Foods should not stay out of refrigeration for longer than two hours. In very hot weather, food should not stay out for longer than one hour.
  • When in doubt, check this website for more information about general guidelines about refrigeration leftovers: http://homefoodsafety.org/

Keeping your food safe once you bring it home is important to keep you and your family healthy.  For more information on home food safety visit: http://homefoodsafety.org

A guide to warming up and cooling down when exercising

cool downThere is no doubt that time spent on warming up and cooling down are essential parts of a workout. Doing so will improve an athlete’s level of performance and accelerate the recovery process needed before and after training, or a competition.

Research suggests that the use of dynamic stretches – slow controlled movements through full range of motion, are the most appropriate exercises for the warm up. By contrast, static stretches are more appropriate for the cool down.

Warm Up

Warm up exercises prepare the body for exercise by increasing the heart rate and blood flow to the muscles, allowing them to loosen up. Doing this gradually increases the body’s temperature and helps muscles become flexible. Any strenuous activity that begins abruptly can cause injury, which is why it is important to warm up first.

This part of your exercise session also protects major joints by increasing the supply of lubrication to the articular cartilages – the body’s shock absorbers. Continue Reading »

Roasted Butternut Squash and Shallot Soup

butternut squash soupBeing lactose intolerant I have to watch my consumption of dairy. As much as I like cream based soups, they don’t like me. So whenever I come across a smooth textured hearty soup that does not call for cream, I get a little excited.  This recipe caught my eye as it calls for an in-season ingredient (squash) and one of my other favorite ingredients, ginger.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (1-inch) cubed peeled butternut squash (about 1 1/2 pounds)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 large shallots, peeled and halved*
  • 1 (1/2-inch) piece peeled fresh ginger, thinly sliced
  • 2 1/2 cups fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons (1-inch) slices fresh chives
  • Cracked black pepper (optional)

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 375° F.
  2. Combine first 5 ingredients in a roasting pan or jelly-roll pan; toss well. Bake at 375° for 50 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Cool 10 minutes.
  3. Place half of squash mixture and half of broth in a blender. Remove center piece of blender lid (to allow steam to escape); secure blender lid on blender. Place a clean towel over opening in blender lid (to avoid splatters). Blend until smooth. Pour into a large saucepan. Repeat procedure with remaining squash mixture and broth. Cook over medium heat 5 minutes or until thoroughly heated. Top with chives and pepper, if desired.

Yields six 2/3 cup servings.

Nutritional information per serving:
Calories:   112
Total fat:   2.5 grams
Saturated fat:   0.4 grams
Monounsaturated fat:   1.7 grams
Polyunsaturated fat:   0.3 grams
Protein:   3.3 grams
Carbohydrate:   22.4 grams
Fiber:   3.6 grams
Cholesterol:   0 mg
Sodium:   266 mg

*shallots: are similar to onions and garlic. They can be used like an onion, however grows in a bunch like garlic.  They have a milder taste than most onion

Recipe from: http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/roasted-butternut-squash-shallot-soup-10000001854009/

Disclaimer: The information found on Affinity's blog is a general educational aid. Do not rely on this information or treat it as a substitute for personal medical or health care advice, or for diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your physician or other qualified health care provider as soon as possible about any medical or health-related question and do not wait for a response from our experts before such consultation. If you have a medical emergency, seek medical attention immediately.

The Affinity Health System blog contains opinions and views created by community members. Affinity does endorse the contributions of community members. You should not assume the information posted by community members is accurate and you should never disregard or delay seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this site.