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Fresh Fruit and Yogurt Popsicles

freshfruitpopsicle

If you are looking for a healthy and refreshing treat, look no more. These simple treats are nutritious and delicious.

Ingredients

1 ½ cups of fresh berries of your choice (blueberries, strawberries, raspberries)
½  banana
2 cups plain or vanilla Greek yogurt
¼ cup white sugar
8 small paper cups
8 Popsicle sticks

Preparation

Place berries, banana, yogurt and sugar in a blender. Blend until smooth. You can also use a mix of berries.

Fill paper cups ¾ full with the fruit and yogurt mixture. Cover the top with aluminum foil. Poke a Popsicle stick through the center of the foil of each cup.

Place the cup in the freezer for 5 hours. To serve, remove foil and peel off the paper cup. Continue Reading »

Delicious and nutritious: corn – summer’s candy

corn

Zea mays. Maize. Maiz.

All of these terms refer to what we typically call corn. There is perhaps no other food that says ‘summer’ like fresh corn on the cob.

Aside from being delicious, corn has a very important role in the history of the Americas, especially in Mesoamerica, the region that is now known as Mexico and Central America. It was also an integral part of Native American history and cuisine. Although corn is not so much revered as a sacred food today, it is still common in our modern diet. American farmers grow about 40 percent of all corn that is consumed. Much of this comes from the ‘corn belt,’ the region made up of Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, Minnesota and parts of Kansas, Missouri and the Dakotas.

Corn comes in varieties of yellow, white, red, pink, black, purple and blue. No matter what color it is, corn contains antioxidants such as carotenoids, lutein and zeaxanthin. Antioxidants are substances found in plant foods that help repair the cellular damage that occurs due to environmental pollutants and normal wear and tear of our bodies. They are in effect the “anti-rusting” agents for our cells.

Corn is also an excellent source of fiber, providing an estimated four to five grams of fiber per cup. In addition, it contains vitamins such as B1, B5 and folic acid and has about five to six grams of protein per cup.

Aside from being nutritious, corn is also versatile! It can be steamed and eaten right off the cob or grilled, roasted or included in soups and stews. It can top salads, be ground up and made into tortillas or creamed corn. It can be popped and enjoyed as a snack in the ever popular popcorn that we enjoy so much.

I enjoy eating corn on the cob with a little bit of butter, salt and pepper. How do you enjoy eating/preparing corn?

Tiny gardens: tips for planting container herbs

tipsplanting

Simon and Garfunkel sang a great song about parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme, but these herbs are also fabulous to grow and use in your meals. While many individuals do not have green space to grow a full-fledged garden, with a little time, effort and love many can be successful at growing container herbs.

Growing herbs such as basil, chives or cilantro in pots allows you to have them close at hand, perhaps right on the kitchen counter or on a window sill, patio or porch. Not only will these herbs provide you with ingredients for your foods, but they will also add greenery to your living space.

Below are a few tips to get you started on growing your container herbs.

  1. Light. Sun is crucial for growth. Most herbs originate from sunny regions and thus will need exposure to sun for at least eight hours a day. If growing the herbs inside, identify your south-facing window and place your containers to receive the most of the sun through that window. If planting outdoors, place in a sunny spot, protected from the wind.
  2. Seeds or plants? Despite the late arrival of spring, you might be better off starting your herb garden from plants. That means you may have to purchase small herb plants that are ready to go outside or be transplanted into a container for growing indoors. Starting from seeds is less expensive, and you can start seeds right in the pot you will be growing them in. However, these should be started two months in advance of spring, in full sun.
  3. Drainage. The container you will be growing your herbs in must have a nice size hole on the bottom so excess water can drain out. The last thing you need is water-drenched herb roots that will end up rotting. Continue Reading »

Strawberries – a tasty and nutritious treat

strawberries

It’s strawberry season! Well…it’s supposed to be strawberry season. However, spring’s late arrival has delayed Wisconsin’s harvest of these precious fruits.

These small, dimpled, delicious red berries are a favorite for many. They happen to be low in calories and high in Vitamin C, potassium, manganese and fiber. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that helps prevent cellular damage, and potassium may help regulate blood pressure. Manganese is a mineral that helps with bone building and maintaining proper bone structure. Strawberries also contain chemical compounds called phenols; phenols have shown some promise in the fight against many inflammatory disorders. Most of all, strawberries are a tasty treat!

Choosing the perfect strawberry is not tricky. The first thing you should know is that strawberries come in different sizes depending on their variety, growing conditions and time of picking. Smaller strawberries tend to be tastier and best for popping in your mouth for a refreshing fruit treat. Bigger strawberries can be used for baking or to make smoothies. These berries should be dry, firm and fully ripe for the best taste. The caps (leaves on the top of the fruit) should look green and fresh. If the cap has been removed, the berry will wilt faster. Wash berries just prior to eating, as wet berries will soften and wilt very fast. Continue Reading »

What you need to know about a stroke

stroke

Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States, with approximately 795,000 people suffering stroke each year. However, did you know that studies have shown that up to 80 percent of strokes are preventable?

A stroke occurs when a blood clot or broken blood vessel interrupts blood flow to the brain, causing brain cells to die. A transient ischemic attack (TIA), or mini-stroke, happens when blood flow to the brain stops briefly and then resolves. While this generally does not cause permanent damage, a TIA can be a warning sign that a full stroke is coming. Other signs and symptoms of stroke include:

  • Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or difficulty understanding speech.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or lack of coordination.
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause. Continue Reading »

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