Home » Posts tagged "injury" (Page 2)

Five exercises to help improve your balance for icy conditions

As we all know, Wisconsin weather can be called confusing at best. Temperatures can swing from 30 degrees one day, to 70 degrees the next day. Wisconsin winters can be particularly problematic due to the snow, ice and cold that lasts from December through March. One area of concern is slipping or falling on the ice. In general, people are more careful when they can see ice in the way, but what happens when we run into black ice or ice covered with snow? Is there anything we can do to prevent these falls, or limit the severity of injury when slipping? There is! I have several exercises and tips that can keep you healthier during the Wisconsin winter ahead. Continue Reading »

How to treat a sprained ankle

sprained ankle Ouch! A sudden jolt of pain just shot through your lower leg and now it feels like your ankle is being squeezed in a vise-grip. You might have been running down the court, taking a hike on rough terrain, stepped in a divot in your yard or maybe you tripped while walking. No matter how you did it, all ankle sprains will have some (if not all) of the following symptoms:

  • Swelling
  • Pain
  • Difficulty moving the ankle
  • Difficulty walking
  • Bruising
  • Warm to the touch
  • Increased pain to the touch Continue Reading »

Six ways to prepare for a disaster

FEMA

First row: (from left) Deb Cross, Diane Schanke, Patty Comperini, Carlene Enama, April Schumacher, Dan Smith, Stacy Thiel, Tammy Hintz. Second row: (from left) Kent Katalinick, Traci Behnke, Laura Ruys, Tom Laabs, Robert Black. Back row: (from right) Brandyn Behnke, Linda Vanstippen, Carl Mohl, Joe Schweda, and Scott Thompson.

I recently attended a training program at the Center for Domestic Preparedness in Anniston, Ala. with 17 other Affinity employees, where we learned the appropriate skills on how to respond to, and manage, emergency incidents. We participated in a mock disaster where a group of domestic terrorists attacked a subway, causing injuries, death and disruption of daily life.

Training is the key to success and we were lucky to have been able to participate in a simulated terrorist exercise. I learned a lot of valuable information not only for our facilities but also for our community and the entire state.

I learned how to prepare as a health care provider, but there are also some things you can do as a community member to prepare for a disaster. Events can strike at any time, so having a plan in place can help make a difference. Red Cross gives a few ways you can help prepare:

  1. Make an emergency preparedness kit
  2. Create and practice your family disaster plan
  3. Have at least one member of your household trained in first aid and CPR/AED
  4. Know what emergencies or disasters are most likely to occur in your community
  5. Read through the appropriate disaster guides for your area
  6. Make an evacuation plan with a map and highlighter and determine two or three destinations and the routes to get there

Share what you have learned with your household, family members and neighbors. Encourage them to be informed.

For more information on the training program I attended click here.

Summer sports season is here: tips for injury prevention

Playing sports is a great way for your child to stay fit and healthy, learn about teamwork and develop a sense of personal satisfaction. However, kids’ injuries from playing sports are on the rise, due to several factors. Most of these sports injuries can be prevented.The first step in preventing sports injuries is finding out why sports injuries occur. Sports injuries may be caused by:
  • Individual risk factors (such as medical conditions including heart, lung or neurological disease)
  • Inadequate physical exams before participating (every child should get a thorough sports-specific physical exam before each season)
  • Playing while injured (whether it is playing with a MSK injury, infection or concussions)
  • Improper training (including overtraining) or coaching, or lack of instruction
  • Not warming up, cooling down and stretching properly
  • Lack of pre-season conditioning
  • Lack of safety equipment or poorly fitted, improper equipment
  • Unsafe playing fields or surfaces
  • Stress and inappropriate pressure to win

Join me at the Bone and Joint Lecture Series: Top 10 things every parent should know on May 22 from 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the St. Elizabeth Hospital, Fowler Conference Room 1, where we will discuss these risk factors in detail as well as what you can do as parent, coach, teacher or player to ensure the safe participation of youth in sports.

For more information on the series, click here to download a PDF of the poster.

 

 

Shoulder injuries: common Problems

The shoulder is a modified ball and socket joint that allows the most motion of any major joint in your body. It is an extremely important joint that allows you to position your arm and hand in space to accomplish your various normal daily activities.

Trauma, overuse, inflammation or muscle imbalances can lead to decreased shoulder function.

If you are having persisting pain, weakness, loss of motion or feelings of instability compromising your function or quality of life, you should consider seeking medical evaluation by your primary care doctor or orthopedic surgeon. Along with a clinical examination, evaluation will likely include x-rays and possibly an MRI.

Here are some of the more common shoulder injuries:

Shoulder Separation actually refers to injury to the acromioclavicular (AC) joint as opposed to the actual shoulder. This is a small joint consisting of the junction of the collarbone (clavicle) and acromion (part of the scapula, aka, shoulder blade). Injury typically involves a forceful fall onto the shoulder that stretches or disrupts the joint capsule or the associated ligaments, which stabilize the collarbone. You may notice swelling, a bump or prominence at the end of the collarbone at the top of the shoulder. This injury does not usually require surgery, but instead medical management and therapy. Severe cases may require ligament reconstruction and stabilization of the collarbone.

Continue Reading »

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