Home » Posts tagged "Mercy Medical Center"

Acute vs. chronic pain


Pain is a symptom indicating harm to the body. It involves both the mind, or central nervous system comprised of the brain and spinal cord, and the body, or peripheral nervous system made up of all the nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord. Your perceptions—beliefs, mood and attitudes—have an impact on your pain experiences.

Pain can be divided into two main categories: acute pain and chronic pain.

Acute pain is defined by the American Chronic Pain Association as pain that comes on quickly, can be severe, but lasts a relatively short time. The cause of acute pain is typically known; it may be physical trauma (cut, broken bones, sprained ankle) or inflammation to the tissues (overuse, infections, disease process).

Acute pain triggers your body to react with an action that would result in decreased pain. If you cut your finger, for example, the pain triggers you to quickly remove your finger away from the object you cut your finger on. Acute pain resolves once healing has occurred, which can vary from a couple of hours up to a few weeks depending on the cause. Treatment depends on the injury, but can include ice, resting the area, modifying the activity or medications.

Chronic pain is defined by the American Chronic Pain Association as ongoing or recurrent pain lasting beyond the usual course of acute illness or injury or more than three to six months. This kind of pain adversely affects an individual’s general well being. A simpler definition is pain that continues when it should not. Continue Reading »

Volunteer opportunities at Mercy Medical Center

Volunteer Spotlight Jim & Prince 6-9-15Are you looking for ways to get involved in your community?

Good news – Mercy Medical Center has volunteer openings! Volunteers at Mercy enjoy directing visitors, transporting patients, running errands, and many other tasks including providing patients’ socialization rehab through animal therapy.

Two volunteers at Mercy Medical Center have been making a difference in patient rehab for the past five years. Jim Papenfuss is a pet therapy volunteer with his therapy dog, Prince, a four-year-old goldendoodle. Jim and Prince take pride in visiting patients, visitors and staff all around the hospital, including the behavioral health unit, intensive care waiting room, rehab unit and the cancer center.

Jim has been involved with pet therapy for the past 17 years. He and Prince enjoy interacting with others and cheering up those in need. Prince, also known as ‘Jim’s big ball of cotton candy,’ loves working with everyone at the hospital, exhibiting kindness and love.

Mercy Medical Center is fortunate enough to have this dynamic duo that are always bringing smiles and joy to everyone around them.

Volunteer Spotlight Jim+ prince 6-9-15

If you are interested in joining the volunteer team at Mercy, please visit our website http://www.affinityhealth.org/volunteer to apply online or contact Mercy Medical Center Volunteer Services at (920) 223-0225.

For those specifically interested in pet therapy, after applying online your dog must meet the standards set by Therapy Dog Inc., which includes being a friendly, well-behaved dog of at least one year of age. For more information on testing and qualifications, please contact therapydogsinc@qwestoffice.net.

What you need to know about certified nurse midwives (infographic)

Everything you need to know about certified nurse midwives (CNM)! Click image for larger view.

More resources:
How to choose a midwife
What is a midwife?


What is a midwife?


The tradition of having a midwife for childbirth is a long one, but make no mistake that today’s certified nurse midwives (CNM) are highly trained medical professionals.

A CNM is an advanced practice nurse with a master’s degree in nursing who specializes in the care of women across their lifespan. CNMs are considered independent practitioners, who have the authority to write prescriptions.

The main difference between a midwife and an OB-GYN is in the perspective of care for their patients. Midwives are trained as nurses first, in the health promotion model of care. This means that they are trained to encourage patients to make healthy lifestyle choices while taking into account physical, emotional, mental and spiritual factors of health. OB-GYNs are trained in the medical model, which focuses mostly on the physical aspect of care and treatment. They specialize in surgery and illness processes, and midwives specialize in education and management of normal pregnancy and birth.

Because they are not called out of the office as frequently for emergencies and surgeries, midwives often have the luxury of being able to spend a great deal of time with their patients. A midwife can typically offer a highly personalized, natural process of care for your pregnancy and birth, and will have a collaborative agreement with a physician, who can consult or assist if risks or issues emerge.

If you decide that a midwife is the best choice for you and your baby, Mercy Medical Center has an expert team of certified nurse midwives, who are now accepting patients. For more information, visit http://www.affinityhealth.org/Affinity/Services/Obstetrics-and-Gynecology/Midwives.htm



How to choose a midwife


As a mom, I know that pregnancy is a time filled with plans and questions. The question, “Who will provide my pregnancy and delivery care?” is front and center for many moms-to-be. Many also wonder “Who will take care of me after I have my baby?” Mercy Medical Center has a full team of compassionate, skilled Certified Nurse-Midwives (CNMs) who can fulfill all of those needs.

Care for all life’s stages
A CNM is an advanced practice nurse who specializes in the care of healthy women across the lifespan. They are RNs who have gone on to receive a master’s degree in nursing and are considered independent practitioners with the authority to write prescriptions. CNMs are required to have a collaborative agreement with a doctor to whom they can refer high-risk patients.

During pregnancy, CNMs offer the same pain management options as an OB-GYN, as well as continuous labor support and other natural pain relief options. Because they are less likely to be called away to surgery and emergencies, CNMs can often spend more time with individual patients to address any concerns you might have about your pregnancy or birth. Continue Reading »

Disclaimer: The information found on Affinity's blog is a general educational aid. Do not rely on this information or treat it as a substitute for personal medical or health care advice, or for diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your physician or other qualified health care provider as soon as possible about any medical or health-related question and do not wait for a response from our experts before such consultation. If you have a medical emergency, seek medical attention immediately.

The Affinity Health System blog contains opinions and views created by community members. Affinity does endorse the contributions of community members. You should not assume the information posted by community members is accurate and you should never disregard or delay seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this site.