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Stay active longer with the ACL Sparing Total Knee replacement

kneereplacement

Are you an active person who wants to stay that way? If you find yourself needing a knee replacement at any point and want to keep your active lifestyle, consider getting the ACL-Sparing Total Knee now available at the Kennedy Center located in Mercy Medical Center.

With a traditional knee replacement surgery, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is almost always removed, even when it’s still healthy. The ACL is a critical ligament in the knee that provides knee and leg stability, and its removal makes staying active after surgery more difficult. Preserving the ACL is important for normal knee function and flexibility, and the ACL-Sparing Total Knee Replacement is highly beneficial to those who want to stay active. This procedure has several important benefits: your knee will have more stability and flexibility; it will feel more like your natural knee, and it will allow you to continue activities that are challenging with a traditional knee replacement. Triple win! Continue Reading »

Doctor, when can I drive?

surgery

Your provider realizes that driving a car is a necessity of everyday life for many people. So when something happens—whether it’s a flat tire or a fractured leg—drivers want it fixed quickly so they can get back on the road again.

With this in mind, patients must realize that all injuries and procedures can alter one’s ability to drive. Braking and accelerating require coordinated activity at the hip, knee and ankle. Steering and shifting require use of the shoulder, elbow and wrist. Sitting upright and watching the road requires good spine function. As we see it, driving requires total body coordination.

Based on the available studies, patients who sustain major lower extremity fractures should delay driving the longest, but nearly every orthopedic procedure will have some impact on a patient’s ability to drive safely. The decision to resume driving should be individualized, as everyone’s body heals at different rates. Patients and their doctors need to talk early on about what impact the procedure may have on driving skills and, after the surgery, how the recovery is proceeding. For elective procedures, driving discussions should take place when the decision to schedule surgery is made.

Most studies have considered emergency braking to be the critical test that allows a patient to return to driving without posing a risk to others, but several other factors must be considered: Continue Reading »

Sports Injury Weekend Walk In Clinic: Providing Convenient Care For Inconvenient Injuries

With fall sports season near, injuries don’t always happen during the week when it’s convenient to see an Affinity Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine provider in clinic. Athletes who experience injuries during competition might need a check-up or evaluation during the morning after the big game, which often falls on a weekend.

Although there are obvious cases where emergency care is needed, there are also less serious injuries that may require medical attention shortly after the incident. Acute injuries, such as fractures, sprains and strains, are common in athletics, but may call for assessment and treatment by a medical professional over the weekend.

With this in mind, we’d like parents to know we are now offering a Saturday morning injury walk in clinic for their junior high or high school athletes who may get injured playing sports like football, soccer or volleyball.

This clinic will be held from 8:30 am until 10:00 am every Saturday from August 25 through October 13.

The Sports Injury Walk In Clinic, will be held at Affinity’s Richmond Street Urgent Care facility in Appleton. No need to schedule an appointment, simply walk in and we will take a look at your athlete. Just as is provided at weekday appointments, I have access to X-ray, splint materials, crutches, braces and other medical supplies that allow for efficient and effective treatment of a young athlete’s injury.

So even though athletic injuries during a busy fall sports schedule are inconvenient and unpredictable, I aim to provide an accessible and valuable medical option to help young athletes return to competing and playing the games they love.

Never Stop Playing

Five Tips to Healthy Knees

For healthy knees, follow these five tips:

Exercise:  Development of leg muscles, particularly quadriceps and hamstrings, can help prevent knee trouble. It has been proven women are more likely to suffer a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which is a more serious knee problem impacting function and stability. Cross-training, stretching and strengthening can all help knees stay pain-free and problem-free. While knee pain should always be checked with a doctor to rule out injury, early arthritis, or other serious conditions, the good news is that knee pain from overuse is usually solvable with ice, rest and exercises that promote healing.

Pacing: Always warm up before you exercise and choose your workouts wisely. Know your limits. Give yourself time to get in shape and don’t try to do too much too soon. Follow the 10% rule: Never increase the duration or intensity of your exercise or activity by more than 10 percent in a week. Train for at least two months before beginning stressful activities such as skiing or running in a race. Strength, flexibility, aerobic and core exercises will help prevent knee and other injuries. Remember a cool down stretch helps prevent injuries as well. Continue Reading »

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