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Top five tips for treating knee pain

Knee pain can affect all sorts of people. I see a variety of patients who complain of knee problems: men and women, young and old, very active and less active people.

If you experience knee pain, here are some helpful tips:

  1. Stretch to relieve joint and muscle tension: It eases muscles and helps them get back in shape.
  2. Ice or cold pack on your knee at least once a day: This will stop inflammation as well as minimize pain and spasm in the area.
  3. Over the counter anti-inflammatory medication: If systems last more that 10 days to two weeks, seek professional help.
  4. Compress or wrap the sore area: This will help decrease swelling.
  5.  Elevate: Elevating your knee reduces stress. Keep the knee area at or above the level of your heart to help minimize swelling. Continue Reading »

Hydrate the Right Way: Ways to Getting Your Daily Intake of Water

Your body needs water. Your body is made up of 75 percent water and constantly needs more of it. We lose water through breathing (water expelled from lungs), urination, defecation and sweat. If your body does not have the right amount of water you will feel it. The common signs and symptoms of not having enough water in your body (dehydration) are:

  • Thirst, excessive thirst
  • Fatigue, tired
  • Headache
  • Dry mouth
  • Little or no urination
  • Muscle weakness
  • Dizziness, lightheadedness

Many individuals wait until they feel thirsty to drink water. Thirst may or may not be a reliable gauge of your water needs. Many people are not very good at sensing thirst and sometimes confuse thirst with hunger which causes them to eat instead of drink water. Continue Reading »

Get Active: Tips to help you successfully start exercising regularly

I have been in my role as an RN Specialist working with patients with chronic conditions for almost a year and a half. I talk with almost all of my patients about their current diets as well as their activity level. Many people admit it is hard to be physically active. Some reasons I hear frequently are “I don’t have time,” “I don’t know where to start,” or “I’m too tired at the end of the day.” Many of us know there are great benefits that come from being physically active, but it can be difficult to find the time (and energy) to work out.

Here are some tips to help you become successful:

  • Start small and build over time. For example, if you haven’t been active lately, start out by trying to work out 1-2 days a week. Once you’re able to do that consistently, try adding in another day. Another option would be to start with a short time, maybe 10-15 minutes. After a week or two, increase to 15-20 minutes at a time. To some people this might not sound like a lot, but it’s still a great improvement over not doing any physical activity.
  • Split it up! If it’s too difficult to find 30 minutes at a time to devote to exercise, try doing 10 minutes 2-3 times a day. Continue Reading »

The bus stops here: 5 things parents can’t forget to do before school starts

Dr. Marsho as a 4th grader and his sisters ready for school

  1.  Schedule sports physicals. These are a great chance to get an overall checkup with your doctor and are required if your child plays school sports. It is important to have all of your sports pre-participation forms (green forms) completed prior to your visit so your doctor has a better idea of your health history. Chronic diseases such as asthma or ADHD often need a separate preventive health visit. Don’t forget to bring in any medication administration forms as well. You can also find more information on back to school physicals here.
  1. Set up kids’ general checkups. It is best that children have general checkups on a yearly basis and gives you the perfect opportunity to make sure their vaccinations are up to date before they head back into the classroom. Booster vaccinations are typically given between 4-5 years old and again around 10-11 years old. There is a new recommendation to get a booster meningococcal meningitis vaccine between 16-18 years old. Both males and females are eligible for the HPV vaccine after age 9. Keep in mind that it is recommended that all children receive influenza vaccines, which typically become available in the fall. Continue Reading »

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