Home » Posts tagged "Wisconsin"

The Transition from Cancer Patient to Survivor

cancersurvivor

I attended a cancer continuing education course back in ’10-‘11 which covered all manner of topics related to patients that have been diagnosed with cancer. One of the most interesting pieces of advice that our speaker gave and that many different groups are taking up as well is that an individual becomes a cancer survivor the moment they are diagnosed. Maybe it would be difficult for you, but I know that personally it would take me less than 2 minutes to name at least 10 people or more that have been diagnosed with some type of cancer within the last 1-2 years alone. Survivorship is extremely different and personal to each individual and can even be separated into different descriptive terms depending on the stage that person is at within their care:

  • Acute survivorship – refers to right after diagnosis or during treatment
  • Extended survivorship – completion of treatment or several months post
  • Permanent survivorship – after treatment has been completed and measured in years Continue Reading »

How to Manage Stress Related to Cancer

cancer

Imagine having a medical test and getting the phone call that there is something abnormal, and more testing is necessary to determine if it’s cancer. Not knowing is a very difficult emotional state. It’s likely that your body will react to this with adrenal hormones like cortisol and its fight or flight response. This leads to racing hearts and minds, difficulty sleeping, tight muscles, digestive problems, and a sense of dis-ease. If this stress response continues, it can affect every cell and organ in your body and impair your body’s ability to heal.

Fortunately, there are many things a person can do to help manage the stress related to a cancer diagnosis and treatment. Social support is essential; allow others to be involved and accept the care you need. Find ways to do the things that normally bring you peace—like physical activity, time in nature or worship services. For many people, spiritual practices or spiritual counseling are very helpful.

Physical activity is a powerful stress reducer. Our bodies are meant to move every day, so keeping as active as possible is important. On the other hand, it’s important to listen to your body, and not over-do it, especially during cancer treatment. Regular exercise can help give a sense of control and remind people of the strength of their minds and bodies. It is also proven to help prevent cancer recurrences. Continue Reading »

Strawberries – a tasty and nutritious treat

strawberries

It’s strawberry season! Well…it’s supposed to be strawberry season. However, spring’s late arrival has delayed Wisconsin’s harvest of these precious fruits.

These small, dimpled, delicious red berries are a favorite for many. They happen to be low in calories and high in Vitamin C, potassium, manganese and fiber. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that helps prevent cellular damage, and potassium may help regulate blood pressure. Manganese is a mineral that helps with bone building and maintaining proper bone structure. Strawberries also contain chemical compounds called phenols; phenols have shown some promise in the fight against many inflammatory disorders. Most of all, strawberries are a tasty treat!

Choosing the perfect strawberry is not tricky. The first thing you should know is that strawberries come in different sizes depending on their variety, growing conditions and time of picking. Smaller strawberries tend to be tastier and best for popping in your mouth for a refreshing fruit treat. Bigger strawberries can be used for baking or to make smoothies. These berries should be dry, firm and fully ripe for the best taste. The caps (leaves on the top of the fruit) should look green and fresh. If the cap has been removed, the berry will wilt faster. Wash berries just prior to eating, as wet berries will soften and wilt very fast. Continue Reading »

Richmond Street Clinic: Ramp closure update

Construction will soon begin on the US 41/Highway 47 interchange in Appleton, also known as Richmond Street. Highway 47 will remain open with lane closures; however, the on/off ramps will be closed throughout the duration of the project. Construction is expected to last through the end of October 2014.

This may affect your commute to and from Richmond Street Clinic. We recommend patients begin using alternate routes. Suggested routes are as follows:

• When traveling north on US 41, exit right on HWY OO (Northland Ave.) and turn left on Richmond St.

AMG_richmond_northdirections-01

• When traveling south on US 41, exit Ballard Rd. to the left, turn right on E. Capitol Dr., cross Richmond St., and make an immediate left into the clinic parking lot.

AMG_richmond_southdirections_2-01

Despite construction taking place, Richmond Street Clinic will remain open and maintain regular business hours:

Family Medicine: Monday – Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Urgent Care: Monday – Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Sunday and holidays, 7:30 a.m. to noon (closed Dec. 25).

If you have additional questions regarding how road construction will impact your commute to and from the clinic, please call 920-380-2715. We urge you all to travel safe and allow for extra travel time during this period.

Five exercises to help improve your balance for icy conditions

As we all know, Wisconsin weather can be called confusing at best. Temperatures can swing from 30 degrees one day, to 70 degrees the next day. Wisconsin winters can be particularly problematic due to the snow, ice and cold that lasts from December through March. One area of concern is slipping or falling on the ice. In general, people are more careful when they can see ice in the way, but what happens when we run into black ice or ice covered with snow? Is there anything we can do to prevent these falls, or limit the severity of injury when slipping? There is! I have several exercises and tips that can keep you healthier during the Wisconsin winter ahead. Continue Reading »

Disclaimer: The information found on Affinity's blog is a general educational aid. Do not rely on this information or treat it as a substitute for personal medical or health care advice, or for diagnosis or treatment. Always consult your physician or other qualified health care provider as soon as possible about any medical or health-related question and do not wait for a response from our experts before such consultation. If you have a medical emergency, seek medical attention immediately.

The Affinity Health System blog contains opinions and views created by community members. Affinity does endorse the contributions of community members. You should not assume the information posted by community members is accurate and you should never disregard or delay seeking professional medical advice because of something you have read on this site.